Feb 252010
 

The Obama administration, which has increasingly been adopting a can’t do attitude when it comes to putting real teeth into financial regulation, now wants to take out the teeth already in place.

Treasury officials are signaling they’d rather not have the same aggressive special inspector general overseeing the $700 billion federal bailout anywhere near their new $30 billion bank subsidy to encourage lending to small business.

I wrote about that inspector general, Neil Barofsky, a couple of weeks ago, suggesting he was one of the few public officials actually trying to protect our money rather than just acting as a rubber stamp for Wall Street’s raid on the U.S. Treasury.

Barofsky has issued a series of scathing reports raising questions about federal officials’ handling of the Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Treasury officials contend that although the $30 billion would come from unspent TARP funds, it’s technically not TARP. So Barofsky should butt out. Their real reason for not wanting Barofsky around is simple: the banks don’t like him looking over their shoulders.

You can’t blame the banks for that. No doubt it’s a lot more fun to spend your federal handout without some nosy former federal prosecutor scrutinizing every move you make.

But for the Obama administration to go along with it is troubling and baffling. The president promised an unprecedented level of accountability, understanding that openness would go a long way toward restoring credibility in the financial system and the government’s ability to oversee it.

But Treasury officials appear to be more concerned with keeping the bankers happy than they are with keeping them honest.

The news about Barofsky surfaced as the administration appeared to be backing away from its recent embrace of former Fed chief Paul Volcker, who favors limits on bank size and risky financial trading. Predictably, the financial titans were balking at the proposals.

The administration’s move against Barofsky is both bad policy and bad politics. It seems designed to hand live ammunition to the mistrustful antigovernment troops of the Tea Party.

Meanwhile, Congressional Democrats have been quiet on the issue. The president and the Democrats have accomplished what at one time would have been seen as a nearly impossible task: handing the mantle of accountability and openness over to Republicans, who are howling with outrage over the idea of keeping Barofsky away from the small-business lending subsidy.

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Ca., said earlier this week: “Denying SIGTARP the ability to defend taxpayers sends a chilling message that IGs who conduct real oversight will be punished for holding this Administration accountable.”

At the very least, the administration needs to come to its senses and regain its commitment to transparency. Let Barofsky do his job. The administration should be paying better attention to his criticisms, not trying to get rid of him.

About Martin Berg

Martin Berg, WheresOurMoney.org editor, is a veteran journalist.

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